Jan 272016
 
 January 27, 2016  Posted by  Free Events, Music, The City  Add comments

cfs Malcolm Holcombe print b&w
Charlotte Folk Society’s next free gathering will take place  Friday,  February 12th, 2016, at 7:30pm, at Great Aunt Stella Center, 926 Elizabeth Avenue. The performer this month is Malcolm Holcombe. Charlotte Folk Society Gatherings are family-friendly and free. Doors open at 7pm, and it’s strongly suggested that you arrive early. Donations are appreciated and essential to presenting the concert series in the Stella Center. Accessible entry and an elevator are available through the ground-level door. Free parking is available adjacent to the Stella Center. Refreshments, a song circle, and a jam session follow the event. This month’s concert features performances by young musicians.

Monthly second-Friday Charlotte Folk Society Gatherings are family-friendly and free; donations are appreciated and essential to holding Gatherings in the Great Aunt Stella Center.

Refreshments, a song circle, jam sessions, songwriters’ circle, and an Appalachian dulcimer group follow the hour-long concert; visitors are welcome to join in or simply listen. Free parking is available in the 4th St. Mecklenburg County parking deck, between Kings Dr. and McDowell St. Enter from the Stella Center parking lot or from 4th Street. Accessible entry and an elevator are available through the ground floor door on the parking lot side of the building.

Acclaimed singer-songwriter Malcolm Holcombe, whose “heartfelt baritone” (NPR) delivers “haunted country, acoustic blues and rugged folk” (Rolling Stone), will release his 14th studio album, Another Black Hole (Gypsy Eyes Music), on February 19, 2016. Produced by Grammy-winning producer and engineer Ray Kennedy and Brian Brinkerhoff, Another Black Hole features Holcombe’s rasping vocals and bright, percussive guitar accentuating his insightful lyrics. “It is Malcolm’s perception of the world that make his songs hit you like a gunpowder blast. His gruff and tough delivery is a primordial power full of grit, spit, and anthropomorphic expression,” says Kennedy.

Another Black Hole does not indicate a change of direction for Holcombe, only a widening and deepening of the groove he has worked for most of his years playing and singing. Lyrically, the songs mingle Holcombe’s off-the-cuff wisdom and sharp-eyed commentary on the human condition. Malcolm is highly regarded and recognized by contemporaries in Americana music including Emmylou Harris, Wilco, and Steve Earle. An “emotionally captivating” (Isthmus), performer, Holcombe has shared the stage with Merle Haggard, Richard Thompson, John Hammond, Leon Russell, Wilco, and Shelby Lynne.

Born in 1955, Malcolm Holcombe grew up in Weaverville, North Carolina. Music was an early passion and became even more important when he lost his parents at a relatively young age. He toured with bands and eventually landed in Nashville. Stories began to circulate about the mysterious dishwasher with the subterranean voice and oracle-like talent. Sadly, so did stories of wildly inconsistent behavior – profound sweetness mixed with bouts of stunning abrasiveness. He flirted with an official music career. But his stunning debut album made for Geffen Records was abruptly shelved, producing melodrama that only exacerbated Malcolm’s drinking and depression. A business that once had a place for complicated genius turned its back on him, and he teetered near the edge. Moving back to the North Carolina hills proved a powerful tonic. He let in help where before he’d pushed it away. With deep faith in God and a commitment to his art, Holcombe repaired himself and his career. Be prepared to hear his remarkable journey of recovery and discovery in his songwriting and in the passion of his performance.

 Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

(required)

(required)